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    Rate this article "XENOBLADE CHRONICLES 2 REVIEW"

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    Julio_Lokin, 6 december 2017 21:21

    XENOBLADE CHRONICLES 2 REVIEW

    Not long ago I would have stuck with the idea of living inside a stomach. However, after many hours playing Xenoblade Chronicles 2, I fell in love with the forests and colorful cascades of the kingdom of Uraya. It is just one of the gigantic Titans that serve as islands or floating continents and home to citizens of the aquatic world of Alrest, and also the setting of this great RPG. As well as game, the Titans become more interesting the more you play.

    You can experience most of it in Rex's shoes, a young man who is introduced living his life sifting through the rubbish of extinct civilizations on the ocean floor. His unlimited optimism never gets annoying, perhaps thanks to the game's excellent dubbing - for the purists, there is a package located in Japanese). It does not take long for Rex to be in a symbiotic relationship with a living, conscious weapon known as a Blade - one of the strongest ever seen in his world.

    Unsurprisingly, some evil people want the power of Rex's Blade, and this causes Xenoblade Chronicles 2 to fall into the rut of fighting the same bosses over and over, but in different situations. It is relevant to highlight how the game deals with the context, making these battles rarely seem repeated, since new changes are introduced each time. When they are repeated, as is the case of a convinced enemy called "The Zekenator", it is for a comic purpose.

    And make no mistake: to compensate for all the reflective philosophy about the nature of the Blades and their human guests - known as Drivers - and the concern for dying Titans, there is the classic nonsense and nonsense of Japanese RPGs. In a moment you may be listening to one of Rex's comrades telling one of the world's most powerful creatures that she must act like the maid "every man seeks"; in the next, you will be witnessing bizarre footage of the pectoral of the same character.

    However, there is also depth of narrative, especially in complex characters such as Special Inquisitor Mòrag, who becomes a formidable opponent, but demonstrates willingness to reconsider his beliefs when countered with conflicting evidence. There is the presence of evil, darkness and death in Xenoblade Chronicles 2, but there is also recurring optimism, believing that the various cultures of the world can overcome their differences when the common good is under threat.

    Artistic design alone seems to reflect between light and obscure themes. While there are some main characters represented in a softer anime style, other secondary NPCs have a more traditional and "realistic" 3D cast. Visual juxtaposition does not always work as well as narrative, as some characters seem to have come out of older games. The Nintendo Switch seems unable to run Xenoblade Chronicles 2 at 1080p resolution when it is in the dock, and there is some slowness when the screen is full. Also, the only technical problem I encountered was a delay of about five seconds with the dubbing, which affected the kinematics at the end of the game.
    The adventure of Rex [...] guarantees the Xenoblade Chronicles 2 an incredible visual variety.
    The adventure of Rex through the expansive world in search of help from the great cultures of Alrest guarantees the Xenoblade Chronicles 2 an incredible visual variety. At certain times you are wandering around areas similar to the Garden of Eden in Uraya, but in others you are in dumps or in the industrial deserts of Mor Ardain. There are giant, and occasionally dynamic areas: an island opens and closes passes to certain locations depending on the tide, and elsewhere, completing journeys allows you to increase the "development level" of an area by unlocking new items in stores and activating discounts .

    There is also impressive verticality to the zones, for example, allowing me to be well above ground level on a frozen cliff, but to know that I could reach the forests below if I found the right way.
    However, it is harder than it seems - and this is one of the few significant flaws in Xenoblade Chronicles 2. The minimap is crap, and the only indication you get for the direction of a mission is a diamond-shaped marking on the top of the screen. This markup only tells you if your goal is below or above you, and that is not enough to know how to proceed; I would say about 5% of my 80 hours in the game were wandering frustrated, trying to figure out which route would take me where I needed to go.

    The maps of the system of fast travel (or "Skip Travel", as it is called in the game) helps a little, since they show the true location of the objective - since you are in the same vertical level. However, you are not normally in a hurry, and it is difficult to use Skip Travel maps as a guide to areas you have not yet explored, especially since they do not open the zone where you are automatically

    Unsurprisingly, some evil people want the power of Rex's Blade, and this causes Xenoblade Chronicles 2 to fall into the rut of fighting the same bosses over and over, but in different situations. It is relevant to highlight how the game deals with the context, making these battles rarely seem repeated, since new changes are introduced each time. When they are repeated, as is the case of a convinced enemy called "The Zekenator", it is for a comic purpose.

    And make no mistake: to compensate for all the reflective philosophy about the nature of the Blades and their human guests - known as Drivers - and the concern for dying Titans, there is the classic nonsense and nonsense of Japanese RPGs. In a moment you may be listening to one of Rex's comrades telling one of the world's most powerful creatures that she must act like the maid "every man seeks"; in the next, you will be witnessing bizarre footage of the pectoral of the same character.

    However, there is also depth of narrative, especially in complex characters such as Special Inquisitor Mòrag, who becomes a formidable opponent, but demonstrates willingness to reconsider his beliefs when countered with conflicting evidence. There is the presence of evil, darkness and death in Xenoblade Chronicles 2, but there is also recurring optimism, believing that the various cultures of the world can overcome their differences when the common good is under threat.

    Artistic design alone seems to reflect between light and obscure themes. While there are some main characters represented in a softer anime style, other secondary NPCs have a more traditional and "realistic" 3D cast. Visual juxtaposition does not always work as well as narrative, as some characters seem to have come out of older games. The Nintendo Switch seems unable to run Xenoblade Chronicles 2 at 1080p resolution when it is in the dock, and there is some slowness when the screen is full. Also, the only technical problem I encountered was a delay of about five seconds with the dubbing, which affected the kinematics at the end of the game.
    The adventure of Rex [...] guarantees the Xenoblade Chronicles 2 an incredible visual variety.
    The adventure of Rex through the expansive world in search of help from the great cultures of Alrest guarantees the Xenoblade Chronicles 2 an incredible visual variety. At certain times you are wandering around areas similar to the Garden of Eden in Uraya, but in others you are in dumps or in the industrial deserts of Mor Ardain. There are giant, and occasionally dynamic areas: an island opens and closes passes to certain locations depending on the tide, and elsewhere, completing journeys allows you to increase the "development level" of an area by unlocking new items in stores and activating discounts .

    There is also impressive verticality to the zones, for example, allowing me to be well above ground level on a frozen cliff, but to know that I could reach the forests below if I found the right way.
    However, it is harder than it seems - and this is one of the few significant flaws in Xenoblade Chronicles 2. The minimap is crap, and the only indication you get for the direction of a mission is a diamond-shaped marking on the top of the screen. This markup only tells you if your goal is below or above you, and that is not enough to know how to proceed; I would say about 5% of my 80 hours in the game were wandering frustrated, trying to figure out which route would take me where I needed to go.

    The maps of the system of fast travel (or "Skip Travel", as it is called in the game) helps a little, since they show the true location of the objective - since you are in the same vertical level. However, you are not normally in a hurry, and it is difficult to use Skip Travel maps as a guide for areas you have not explored, especially since they do not open the zone where you are forcing you to lose several seconds for each map search . The menu system is a bit awkward, but some elements work better than others. The map, unfortunately, is not one of these better elements.

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    Comments

    awesome game

    2 february 2020 16:09
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