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    EternaLEnVy’s smurf account banned for 6 months

    Smurfing and account boosting in Dota 2 are illegal actions punished by Valve whenever a player is caught doing such. However, the high ranked players, and especially the professional ones, are usually holding more than a smurf account. The pros used to create multiple Dota 2 account mainly to be able to play ranked games without being instantly recognized.
    Over the years the matchmaking rank became extremely important not only for the pros but also for those who aspire at a professional career. Reaching Immortal ranks might bring to a rising pub star an offer from a pro team, a life changing opportunity, as the community has already witnessed happening to Topias “Topson” Taavitsainen in 2018. But while most of the pros smurf to stay away from the public eye, or to experiment with new strategies, master heroes that are not in their pool and so son, others are actually streaming their sessions on smurfs and, in fact, they try to protect their main account from a possible ban.
    Valve has been very active lately in monitoring matchmaking history. Ever since they separated the MMR system in two different numbers, core and support, they’ve been listening more and more to the community and acted based on the feedback received. It was less than a month ago when they the community about smurfing and boosting as actions that will be heavily punished, as well as role steals. They even gave the option of reporting a teammate for not playing the role selected, and this is where Jacky “EternaLEnVy” Mao got in trouble.
    The incredibly long queues for high ranked MMR games got to some of the players, EE especially, who for a couple of weeks even titled his stream “party queue or role steal.” His behavior score on the smurf account dropped down to 1. After Valve implemented the role report, Envy stopped the intentional role steal, but he kept playing unconventional heroes for a support position.
    According to a post he made on Reddit, Envy raised his behavior score from 1 to 1584 in two weeks by stopping the role steal method.
    However, in an update from two days ago, Valve mentioned that following: “players that have a behavior score below 3000 are no longer able to use chat or voice until their score rises above the acceptable threshold. We believe this more gradual user-facing reinforcement mechanism will be valuable for both protecting the larger population from outliers and as a warning system for players who are moving in the wrong direction that might encourage them to improve. We set the threshold score at 3000 due to the low probability that anyone would be that low without having had a consistently negative impact on the experiences of many different teammates.”
    By October 12, 2019
    Smurfing and account boosting in Dota 2 are illegal actions punished by Valve whenever a player is caught doing such. However, the high ranked players, and especially the professional ones, are usually holding more than a smurf account. The pros used to create multiple Dota 2 account mainly to be able to play ranked games without being instantly recognized.
    Over the years the matchmaking rank became extremely important not only for the pros but also for those who aspire at a professional career. Reaching Immortal ranks might bring to a rising pub star an offer from a pro team, a life changing opportunity, as the community has already witnessed happening to Topias “Topson” Taavitsainen in 2018. But while most of the pros smurf to stay away from the public eye, or to experiment with new strategies, master heroes that are not in their pool and so son, others are actually streaming their sessions on smurfs and, in fact, they try to protect their main account from a possible ban.
    Valve has been very active lately in monitoring matchmaking history. Ever since they separated the MMR system in two different numbers, core and support, they’ve been listening more and more to the community and acted based on the feedback received. It was less than a month ago when they the community about smurfing and boosting as actions that will be heavily punished, as well as role steals. They even gave the option of reporting a teammate for not playing the role selected, and this is where Jacky “EternaLEnVy” Mao got in trouble.
    The incredibly long queues for high ranked MMR games got to some of the players, EE especially, who for a couple of weeks even titled his stream “party queue or role steal.” His behavior score on the smurf account dropped down to 1. After Valve implemented the role report, Envy stopped the intentional role steal, but he kept playing unconventional heroes for a support position.
    According to a post he made on Reddit, Envy raised his behavior score from 1 to 1584 in two weeks by stopping the role steal method.
    However, in an update from two days ago, Valve mentioned that following: “players that have a behavior score below 3000 are no longer able to use chat or voice until their score rises above the acceptable threshold. We believe this more gradual user-facing reinforcement mechanism will be valuable for both protecting the larger population from outliers and as a warning system for players who are moving in the wrong direction that might encourage them to improve. We set the threshold score at 3000 due to the low probability that anyone would be that low without having had a consistently negative impact on the experiences of many different teammates.”
    Last night, Envy’s smurf account got banned for 6 months, and that is most likely linked to the fact that he received an insane amount of reports, regardless of what he actually did in the games he played lately.

    13 october 2019 07:38 5035
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