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    Total Battle: Tactical War Game

    (3.3/5) 382 rates

    Broken Link

    Did anyone try to play the game and the link was broken? Or is it just me?

    26 october 2020 12:29 8371
    0

    it worked for me, im not sure

    5 november 2020 05:45 8371
    0

    this game is so good and gooder than any one else

    6 november 2020 04:19 8371
    0

    I HAVE SOME GOOD news. Next month, The Atlantic will once again send fiction home to our subscribers, in a special supplement that will accompany our May issue. On the newsstand, the supplement will be bound into the May magazine.

    The short story has been integral to The Atlantic since our first issue, in 1857, in which we published four stories, including “The Mourning Veil,” by Harriet Beecher Stowe. But as longtime, generously loyal readers know, for the past five years we have published fiction once a year in a special newsstand issue, rather than in any of our 10 subscriber issues. During what has been widely noted to be a “challenging” (read: harrowing) business environment for publishing, this has been a necessary compromise. But none of us has been particularly happy with it, and we have been searching for ways to once again place great fiction in front of all our readers.

    This article appears in the April 2010 issue.

    Check out the full table of contents and find your next story to read.

    See More
    Issue cover image
    With our fiction issue last year, we began a partnership with Luminato, the Toronto Festival of Arts and Creativity, which shares our love of literature. Building on the success of that first outing, which included participation by some of our editors and authors in the festival, we have jointly decided this year to raise our ambition by creating the supplement, which will include, along with half a dozen short stories, a powerful essay on writing and loss by Joyce Carol Oates. We think—we hope!—we are seeing renewed interest in the short story. Last fall, we started a digital fiction series, publishing to the Amazon Kindle two short stories a month by authors like Christopher Buckley, Curtis Sittenfeld, and Paul Theroux. All told, The Atlantic is now publishing more fiction than it has since the mid-1970s.

    6 november 2020 04:20 8371
    0

    I HAVE SOME GOOD news. Next month, The Atlantic will once again send fiction home to our subscribers, in a special supplement that will accompany our May issue. On the newsstand, the supplement will be bound into the May magazine.

    The short story has been integral to The Atlantic since our first issue, in 1857, in which we published four stories, including “The Mourning Veil,” by Harriet Beecher Stowe. But as longtime, generously loyal readers know, for the past five years we have published fiction once a year in a special newsstand issue, rather than in any of our 10 subscriber issues. During what has been widely noted to be a “challenging” (read: harrowing) business environment for publishing, this has been a necessary compromise. But none of us has been particularly happy with it, and we have been searching for ways to once again place great fiction in front of all our readers.

    This article appears in the April 2010 issue.

    Check out the full table of contents and find your next story to read.

    See More
    Issue cover image
    With our fiction issue last year, we began a partnership with Luminato, the Toronto Festival of Arts and Creativity, which shares our love of literature. Building on the success of that first outing, which included participation by some of our editors and authors in the festival, we have jointly decided this year to raise our ambition by creating the supplement, which will include, along with half a dozen short stories, a powerful essay on writing and loss by Joyce Carol Oates. We think—we hope!—we are seeing renewed interest in the short story. Last fall, we started a digital fiction series, publishing to the Amazon Kindle two short stories a month by authors like Christopher Buckley, Curtis Sittenfeld, and Paul Theroux. All told, The Atlantic is now publishing more fiction than it has since the mid-1970s.
    I HAVE SOME GOOD news. Next month, The Atlantic will once again send fiction home to our subscribers, in a special supplement that will

    6 november 2020 04:22 8371
    0

    1,001 Nights, also known as The Thousand and One Nights or Arabian Nights, is a collection of Middle Eastern and South Asian folk tales that were originally published together during the Islamic Golden Age. The stories — from historical tales to tragic romances to comedies — were collected over many centuries by a huge range of scholars and authors. Read below to find ten of the most standout stories.

    Shahryar and Scheherazade
    This frame story for the entirety of the work is the common thread between each edition of Nights. Shahryar is a king who rules over India and China. He becomes aware of his wife’s infidelity and has her executed, and afterward, in anger and sadness, decides all women are guilty and must be executed. Shahryar marries and executes several virgins, each on the morning after they are married. When the king takes Scheherazade as his wife, she tells him a story on the night of their marriage, but she doesn’t have time to finish it. The king postpones her execution to find out the end of the story. The next night she finishes her story but begins a new one, and Shahryar postpones her execution again. They continue this for 1,001 nights.

    Scheherazade and Sultan Schariar (1880) © Ferdinand Keller/WikiCommons
    Scheherazade and Sultan Schariar (1880) | © Ferdinand Keller/WikiCommons
    Aladdin’s Wonderful Lamp
    Although it wasn’t added to the collection until the 18th century by French scholar Antoine Galland, ‘Aladdin’ is one of the most popular tales from 1,001 Nights because of its modern Disney adaptation. In the original tale, Aladdin is a poor, young man in ‘one of the cities of China.’ A sorcerer deceives Aladdin and persuades him to steal an oil lamp from a magic cave. Aladdin accidentally releases a genie from the lamp, and so a series of events unfold in which Aladdin’s every wish comes true, but only to be dismantled by the villain. Thankfully, a Disney-approved happy ending is in store.

    Aladdin in the Magic Garden © Max Liebert/WikiCommons
    Ala

    6 november 2020 04:23 8371
    1

    Related Books:
    9/24: Welcome Kottke.org readers. Thanks for stopping by. Once you’re done reading about The World’s Longest Novel, check out some of our more recent articles or have a look at our Notable Posts, listed in the right sidebar. If you like what you see, subscribe to our RSS feed. –The Millions

    Over the years, there has been some controversy over what constitutes the world’s longest novel. The Guinness Book of World Records gives the honor to Marcel Proust’s elephantine Remembrance of Things Past, weighing in at 9,609,000 characters (including spaces). Other commentators cite Henry Darger’s In the Realms of the Unreal, a 15,000 page, handwritten tome that has yet to see print. (Darger is said to have commented: “This is what you can do when you have no radio or television.”) Why write something so long? Armen Shekoyan, an Armenian writer committed to producing the world’s longest novel, says:

    If you write a book according to the usual criteria, one person may like it, the other may dislike it, but when you write ten volumes, no one will say that the book is in eight.

    Shekoyan, however, doesn’t comprehend the magnitude of the task he has set for himself. After all, what’s ten volumes compared to the 106 volumes of the Hakkenden, a Japanese epic running to 38 million words.

    So, whose book is the biggest? The controversy will soon be put to rest, possibly for all time, when writer Richard Grossman installs his 3 million-page novel Breeze Avenue on a remote mountain in Kaha, Hawaii. Although it is unclear how many words Breeze Avenue comprises, an educated guess puts the count at over 1 billion.

    cover
    cover
    Breeze Avenue is part of Grossman’s American Letters Trilogy, the first two volumes of which, The Alphabet Man and The Book of Lazarus, were published by FC2. Grossman, and a cast of hundreds, have been working on the book for over thirty-five years, and it remains in a constant state of revision. Grossman tentatively plans to print just six copies of

    6 november 2020 04:30 8371
    0

    Related Books:
    9/24: Welcome Kottke.org readers. Thanks for stopping by. Once you’re done reading about The World’s Longest Novel, check out some of our more recent articles or have a look at our Notable Posts, listed in the right sidebar. If you like what you see, subscribe to our RSS feed. –The Millions

    Over the years, there has been some controversy over what constitutes the world’s longest novel. The Guinness Book of World Records gives the honor to Marcel Proust’s elephantine Remembrance of Things Past, weighing in at 9,609,000 characters (including spaces). Other commentators cite Henry Darger’s In the Realms of the Unreal, a 15,000 page, handwritten tome that has yet to see print. (Darger is said to have commented: “This is what you can do when you have no radio or television.”) Why write something so long? Armen Shekoyan, an Armenian writer committed to producing the world’s longest novel, says:

    If you write a book according to the usual criteria, one person may like it, the other may dislike it, but when you write ten volumes, no one will say that the book is in eight.

    Shekoyan, however, doesn’t comprehend the magnitude of the task he has set for himself. After all, what’s ten volumes compared to the 106 volumes of the Hakkenden, a Japanese epic running to 38 million words.

    So, whose book is the biggest? The controversy will soon be put to rest, possibly for all time, when writer Richard Grossman installs his 3 million-page novel Breeze Avenue on a remote mountain in Kaha, Hawaii. Although it is unclear how many words Breeze Avenue comprises, an educated guess puts the count at over 1 billion.

    cover
    cover
    Breeze Avenue is part of Grossman’s American Letters Trilogy, the first two volumes of which, The Alphabet Man and The Book of Lazarus, were published by FC2. Grossman, and a cast of hundreds, have been working on the book for over thirty-five years, and it remains in a constant state of revision. Grossman

    6 november 2020 04:30 8371
    0

    Hey Everyone!

    With our existing forum guidelines being over a year old, it is now time for an update! I’m Isabell, also known as Ratique, and while many of you have interacted with me for years as forum moderator and part of the community, I’m now the new Creator Happiness Manager at Tapas. My goals are to improve the communication between the Tapas team and you, and to find better ways to include you in exciting projects that improve your time here as creators! I can’t wait to see how we can grow closer together as a community and how I can help you get the most out of Tapas!

    Our rules have served to provide and maintain a welcoming, healthy and creator-friendly culture. Tapas is now home to over 50,000 creators (!) and we’re so lucky to have a group of creators on these forums that are kind, supportive and always work to help each other out. There aren’t many places like these online and I, as well as the team, are grateful for all of you being here.

    1. There's Never a Wrong Time to be Polite

    Always be courteous to your fellow Tapas readers and creators. Don't forget that there is a real person behind every post, who, just like you, wants to be treated with respect and tolerance. Keep your cool even in the most heated discussions. Above all else, we want everyone to feel safe and welcomed in our forums. Any behavior that threatens the culture we've all helped to build will not be tolerated.

    We try our best to resolve issues behind the scenes by communicating directly with readers and creators. If you feel that there are posts that are actively hostile or are attempts to instigate any hostility, please flag those posts or get in touch with one of the moderators listed at the end.

    We operate with a two strike policy. First time offenders (depending on severity) will receive a temporary ban (typically lasting 3 to 7 days), and repeat offenders will receive a permanent ban.

    2. Tag, Search and Quote are Your Friends

    Before creating new topics, please check for

    6 november 2020 04:31 8371
    0

    not dead, works for me even now

    9 november 2020 09:01 8371
    0

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